Case Studies

Case study 1

Trying to provide flexible support to customers under contracts can be a daunting experience, particularly if there are many of them, and it covers 24 hours a day.  Our client needed to be able to change data on their website from anywhere in the world, and at any time.  

Platinum is 24/7 365 days, Gold is 365 days but with restrictive cover, and Silver is even more restrictive.  Last but not least all others with no support cover.

A process was designed where around 10.30 each day, including bank holidays, we can extract details directly from their website, and download this information into our call scripting software.  The customer details are then filtered through the callflow depending upon the support provided for that day.

The client also controls their own call-out rota, which we also extract from their website, and import into our software for use by all our call handlers.  It covers the on-call engineer, backup and escalation staff, together with about 20 administration managers.

All this means that not only can the client change their on-call staff each day depending upon work commitments, travel, holiday or illness; but they can have total flexibility to change the status of their clients, their duty support staff, and TAS is always using the latest information.

 


Case study 2

The client wanted us to deal with the Fire Alarms for a world renowned animal hospital.   In other words if the fire alarm went off we needed to be able to contact the right Fire Brigade, and be able to tell them exactly where to find the fire.  

The client is situated almost between two counties and if the wrong Fire Brigade was contacted it would considerably delay the response times, with the result that priceless animals might perish or be seriously harmed.

We decided in the first instance that it would be prudent to have a separate phone line altogether for this client.  One which could be answered no matter what - it would only ever receive the one type of call - and it would be a major incident if it rang, with global media interest being generated as a result. 

We would also need to be able to receive regular "test" alarms, all part of ensuring that the process was always working.  So every alarm in the hospital is now programmed with a unique number which automatically dials into our Control Room, and tells us precisely where the fire is.  We can then call the Fire Brigade and give them exact directions as to where to find the fire particularly if it can't easily be seen.

Over the past 20 years or so, even though the Fire Bigade have been called out, we are very thankful that it has only been for false alarms - at least as far as we know.  No news is good news!